Will a Witcher’s Sword Turn You BLUE? | Because Science Footnotes

Will a Witcher’s Sword Turn You BLUE? | Because Science Footnotes


– If you are a creature
that lives in and moves about in shells, there’s a very fun scientific term that
describes your lifestyle. It is conchicoly which is very fun and it’s got
a good pleasing mouth feel. Conchicoly, conchicoly, conchicoly. And if you live in a shell as a human that term is just called depression. It’s fine. Real talk, talk about your feelings. Someone will be there to
offer a shoulder or to help. Conchicoly. (upbeat music) Hello, and welcome to
another edition of Footnotes the companion show to Because Science where I take all of your comments, questions, and corrections, then I bust out of a shell
of science to answer them and then I tell you what’s coming up next on this here very channel. Hint, it’s about an
apocalypse, but I’m not evil. Very important to know. But getting right down into it in last episode of Because Science,
we were, what’s that? Yeah, no, I was just getting to it. Okay, we were going back to the Witcherverse to try to figure out how a
Witcher’s silver sword works. You asked for it, so we did the science in this here video that you can find on YouTube if you haven’t seen yet. I said that because
silver, like many medals, has an oligodynamic effect. It’s a biocide to
certain types of organism if those organisms had a similar biology to the monsters on the continent, then maybe a silver sword
would do well at slashing a siren, there we go. But we already talked about that. What I wanted to know is what did you have to say? (upbeat music) Oh, yeah, it’s solid metal. (upbeat music) Our first comment comes from frequent commenter
Kerry Noir Private Eye who says, “How much
silver would we as humans “have to ingest for it to harm
or damage us and ourselves?” I would answer this question, but another commenter, Talas Blue, comments right underneath
Kerry and says, “It’s not clear “how much colloidal silver,
a silver that is suspended “in the solution like silver particles “in something like water
dissolved into it?” We don’t know how much it can be harmful but it can build up in your body’s tissue
over months or years, that it is that it bioaccumulates. Your body doesn’t naturally get rid of it and so if you have it over time it will just build up in
your body until it is toxic. The same thing happens with mercury and mercury in fish that eat other things infected
with mercury and so on. Most commonly, this exposure
results in our giria, oh, thank you, our giria, I knew that, which is a blue-gray discoloration of your skin, eyes, internal
organs, nails, and gums. As it kills pathogens, I would say when it starts effecting
your gut bacteria. Our giria is nothing to mess around with. As you can see from a picture of this man who looks like a smurf. It’s not funny, he died but he had so much silver exposure. I believe he was living near
a silver mine or something or taking colloidal
silver, one of the two. It turned him completely blue and it didn’t turn out well. So silver can handle monsters
but it can also handle men. (speaker growling)
(upbeat music) The dose makes the poison. Anything can be toxic. Even water can be toxic. There are reports in
the medical literature, for example, of marathon runners dying by drinking too much water. Everything has a lethal dose. Water, sugar, salt, all that stuff. It just depends on how much you take. We think of toxicity in terms of how little it would take to kill you but everything’s toxic. Just go on the Internet. I’m looking at you Twitter. Our next comment comes from
frequent commenter godsoloved who says, “Hey, Kyle, love the show.” (Kyle laughing) “I only have one highly
scientific question. “How do you know what a
drowner’s but tastes like? “Are you creating an army of
them in your villainous layer “and if you are, why would
you bite their butts? “Also can you answer this while “keeping a straight
face in the first take?” Nummy num drowner bum. What you may not know about Footnotes is I do this entire show in one take. I don’t really redo any
questions or anything that I say. It’s all kind of out of, Drowner butt, you, look, you need the essence of drowner butt combined with wolf’s bane to form an effective oil against igimara but every experienced Witcher knows that. (Kyle laughing) I have no emotions, but I’m laughing. One take. HYX says, “Kyle, you can’t fool me. “I know you really are Gaunter O’Dimm “and I will never strike a deal with you.” Wink. (laughing) Real life emojis are dumb. Look, there’s no way you can prove that I’m Gaunter O’Dimm, Master
Mirror, the devil himself. Then I would have to
put a scar on your face noting that you serve me for all time or at least until you fulfill my wishes and then you have to get a red haired guy who has an undercut
somehow like 300 years ago even though that’s a very modern haircut to get me to dance with his dead brother and then do the other quests. The Witcher 3 DLC is fantastic. What was I talking about? Our next comment comes
from MrStevieboywonder who says, “Hey, Kyle, love the show. “I’m an electrical
apprentice in my day job.” I love when technical people comment. It’s the best kind of
comment, technically. As part of our uniform we cannot wear jewelry made of metals because of their conductivity like silver’s extreme conductivity. One of my co-workers
actually lost a finger due to his gold wedding ring getting shocked by high voltage low amps which super heated the ring
and welded it to his skin. (whooshing noises) Yeah, electricity is
nothing to mess around with. I saw some pretty gnarly
photos in engineering school that they showed us on day one of why you shouldn’t try to steal
copper wire out of buildings. It makes it look like
Igni was used on you. I have nothing more to add. That sucks. (laughing) Sorry, but the nerdiest comment at the time I’m filming this
episode I gotta give to. He says his name is Tom
because it’s hard to pronounce but I know it’s Thomas. You think I don’t know Polish men’s names. Wrong. He says, “Hey, Kyle, love the show.” Thank you, I put my
whole existence into it. He says as a side note not all monsters are susceptible to silver. He then goes on to mention a
lot of context for the silver. So they were talking about even making silver nanoparticles
which I described in some of the studies that we referenced in that very episode and then goes on to say silver deals more damage than other metals to monsters and can disrupt their
supernatural abilities meaning that silver has
only magical effects or both magical and physical effects on monsters unless their abilities are not magical or superphysical but that couldn’t realistically exist because for super generation a humongous amount of
energy will be required for invisibility along with
other complex features. That would just be quite impossible for that to
exist, like for Broxa. “Kind regards from Poland.” (laughing) I knew it. (cheering)
(upbeat music) I will admit, the explanation
for why silver swords hurt monsters in the Witcherverse is probably a little bit more complicated than we made it. I just wanted to cover this
very basic, antimicrobial biocide like effect because I thought it was very interesting but that’s what I love about the Witcher games and the books. They go into this in detail. They say why this
happens, how this happens, how does magic and physics interplay? I think the best world
building incorporates all of those ideas into one
internally consistent picture and for pointing that out Thomas, you are indeed a super nerd. (upbeat music)
Hello from the Void. I don’t know where it is
in relation to Poland. But of course I’m not always right. What’s that? Oh, correction of power. It’s gotta be… Our first correction
comes from Nicolas Ramirez who says, “Hey, Kyle, love the show.” You guys, you make me feel so good. I’m a licensed veterinary technician. Thank you so much. I’ve been to a lot of vets in the last couple of
months and I appreciate it. And in veterinary medicine we will use a silver based cream as not
only an antibacterial treatment but also as an antifungal
treatment as well. The application of sliver has gone beyond just the dark ages when we didn’t have pharmaceuticals and
antibiotics and that kind of thing. We still use it for a number of treatments on humans and in our
animal friends as well. Thanks for pointing that out. Our second correction
comes from Jordan Stokes who says, “In Greek philosophy “self-reflection was seen as
a path to self-fulfillment “and living a good life. “Mercury and silver could
provide a literal reflection “and were thought to help in
the self-reflection process.” What is cool is that monster stories have been used to demonstrate and to get people to come
face to face with human flaws because silver and mercury were seen as a pathway to encouraging purity. People have started saying
that weapons of silver were super effective against monsters. They believe that self-reflection could destroy the monsters
inside of men too. Such a cool instance of how the process of methodology,
fantasy, and reality, can meld together to give us
some really great stories. Yes. Our next correction comes from El Weasel which means the weasel in Spanish who says, “Hey, Kyle, great
show, arbitrary compliment.” It’s not arbitrary if I love it. “The steel sword has a different guard “than you showed in your episode. “Only the silver sword has
the sharply angled guard.” The silver sword has the V-shaped guard and the steel, like the T in steel has more of a T-shaped guard and I got that wrong
because it was gonna take too long to change all of the animations. (upbeat music) All right, you got me. Our next correction comes
from DollSkin 7, gross, who says, “But if it takes a few ions “to kill bacteria wouldn’t it take “them a lot of silver “to give a monster some lethal poisoning “at least more than what “is delivered in one to five strikes.” Whoa, have you ever fought a fiend without relic oil on your sword? That can take, death march difficulty in
the Witcher 3 Wild Hunt with no bombs. That could take 20 minutes if you’re trying to get
the chivo, which I did. But I agree with your correction. It would take a lot of material transferring off of the sword to the monster to give
it what we would consider for a human-sized organism a lethal dose so that leads me to believe if we are correct in thinking
this oligodynamic effect has something to do with why monsters are
susceptible to silver that the monsters in the Witcherverse are much, much, much,
more sensitive to sliver than the average micro. That would be my explanation. But the nerdiest correction
at the time I’m filming this episode, I’ve gotta
give to Xeres Gaming who says, “Hey, Kyle, I
really, really love the show. “I’m not just saying it
to get into footnotes. “I really mean it.” Well, hey, look what happened. Thank you. “I’m a med student.” Good luck. “So I have
quite a bit of knowledge “about cellular biology
and I noticed that when “you were talking about the effects “of silver on bacteria you
mentioned some organelles “like mitochondria,” the
powerhouse of the cell, “Which are exclusive to eukaryotic cells “and bacteria which is a prokaryotic cell. “They wouldn’t have those. “With your diagram and
organelle explanation “you would have been able to explain “the effect of silver
in a protist organism “which is a unicellular
eukaryotic organism also. “When silver enters the cell “it may bind to certain enzymes “inhibiting the proper function
or changing the structure “and that would be
catastrophic for any organism.” Good point. So in my diagram of what
silver can do to microbe cells I had organelles in there, nucleus in there containing
DNA, mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, you’ve taken biology, and that wouldn’t appear
in all of the microbes. If you go back to the study
that I was referencing for this which looks at silver nanoparticles in their antimicrobial effect it says that these nanoparticles have been proven effective
against over 650 microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Some of these other organisms would have the mitochondria
that you’re speaking of. So if we’re talking about just bacteria then my explanation wouldn’t work but we’re talking about a number, hundreds of different microorganisms and if Witcher monster biology had similar biology to some of those then our explanation starts to work and then you might still have to introduce a little bit of magical
purity kinda stuff into it but I like where our explanation is going but for making sure
we’re still being honest about what we’re talking
about, Xeres Gaming, you are indeed a super nerd. (upbeat music)
Look at you on Footnotes now. Good luck in med school. (whooshing noises) Now moving right along to this week’s episode of Because Science. This week’s episode is what would happen if the Sun exploded.
(ominous music) That’s right, in this week’s
episode of Because Science we’re going through a
fun thought experiment and thinking about what would
happen if our Sun exploded. What would happen to the humans on Earth? Could they survive? What would be the
mechanism of their demise? Is there any way to stop it? You’re gonna have to watch
the episode to find out. But before we find out about super nova and exploding Suns, please go watch the latest episode of Because Science if you haven’t yet all about the Witcher silver swords and leave me your best nerdy comments,
corrections, and questions, at youtube.com/becausescience facebook.com/becausescience and @BecauseScience on
Instagram and the Day After and don’t forget cat nip is the only hallucinogen that we
recreational give to animals. You’re making your cat trip. (upbeat music)

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