Philip Emeagwali Invention | Changing the Way We Look at the Computer | Famous Scientists

Philip Emeagwali Invention | Changing the Way We Look at the Computer | Famous Scientists


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Changing the Way We Look at Supercomputers] [Philip Emeagwali Invention] The contribution of Philip Emeagwali
to science is this: I figured out
how to turn parallel processing that was science fiction
when it was first published on February 1, 1922
into a supercomputer technology that became non-fiction
and made the news headlines after I discovered it
on July 4, 1989. To invent
is to turn science fiction into non-fiction.
In 1989, and thereafter, I was in the news because
I was the first person to figure out how to solve the grand challenge problem of
supercomputing. My invention
of practical parallel processing inspired the development
of a surrounding array of parallel algorithms
and supporting techniques and technologies
that, in turn, makes the everyday computer more powerful. [Paradigm Shift in Supercomputing] The paradigm shift in computing
that I discovered on July 4, 1989 and discovered
as the practical parallel supercomputer can be quantified and measured
by the speed increase of the modern supercomputer.
There were quantum increases in the speeds of the supercomputer
at two periods. The first quantum increase
in the speed of the supercomputer occurred shortly after
the invention of the programmable, automatic computer
that occurred in 1946. The second quantum increase
in the speed of the supercomputer occurred shortly after my invention
of practical parallel processing. Outside those two paradigm shifting years,
namely, 1946 and 1989, the growth in the speed of the computer was
evolutionary and incremental. In 1989, I was in the news because
I figured out how to harness a new internet
that is a new global network of 64 binary thousand processors
and figured out how to harness them
to solve the toughest problems arising in physics, algebra, and calculus.
I discovered how to solve the grand challenge problems
in five stages: namely, physics, calculus, algebra, computing,
and parallel processing them across a new internet
that was a new global network of two-raised-to-power sixteen
ensemble of processors that was my metaphor
for a similar ensemble of computers. The parallel supercomputer
is widely used to solve the toughest problems
arising in science, engineering, and medicine.
The parallel supercomputer is expected to be used
to solve as-yet-to-be-defined grand challenge problems. [The Rich and Fertile Consequences of Philip
Emeagwali Supercomputer] The supercomputer
is the most advanced instrumentation in mathematical physics,
and in particular, the technology that gave birth to the fields of
extreme-scaled computational geophysical fluid dynamics
that encompasses modeling the weather above the surface of the Earth
and modeling the [quote unquote] “weather” one-mile below the surface
of the Earth. The latter is a precondition
to discovering and recovering otherwise elusive crude oil and natural gas
that are buried one mile deep inside a production oilfield.
I imagined each oilfield in the Niger-Delta region
of southeastern Nigeria to be like a sponge
that is the size of a town and that is saturated
with crude oil, injected water, and natural gas.
The parallel supercomputer opened the door
to understanding and foreseeing climate changes
and doing so with greater clarity. The invention of parallel processing
is central to the development of the computer and the supercomputer.
The parallel supercomputer has rich and fertile consequences
for science and society. [Philip Emeagwali Supercomputer] Shortly after my breakthrough discovery of
practical parallel processing that occurred on the Fourth of July 1989,
namely, my experimental discovery of 64 binary thousand,
or sixteen orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of the supercomputer,
all the vector supercomputer manufacturers in the world abandoned
their vector processing technology and adopted
the parallel supercomputer technology that they previously mocked, ridiculed, and
dismissed as a huge waste of every body’s time.
Today, parallel processing is the technology that underpins
all supercomputers. [Paradigm Shift in Supercomputing] My discovery
of practical parallel processing is a paradigm shift and a quantum leap
over both the conventional supercomputer and the vector supercomputer.
As expected, my invention of practical parallel processing
opened the doors to the solutions of several
grand challenge problems arising in science, engineering,
and medicine. Before my discovery of 1989,
the parallel supercomputer was not used to discover and recover otherwise elusive crude
oil and natural gas. After my discovery
of practical parallel processing, one in ten supercomputers
were purchased by the petroleum industry
and used to parallel process their initial-boundary value
grand challenge problems of mathematical physics.
Before my discovery, to parallel process a grand challenge problem
and do so across an ensemble of eight processors
was believed to be impossible. That impossible speedup barrier
was enshrined into supercomputer textbooks
as the infamous Amdahl’s Law of diminishing returns
in the speeds of the parallel supercomputer. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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