Nine Emeagwali Equations Are My Contributions to Modern Mathematics

Nine Emeagwali Equations Are My Contributions to Modern Mathematics


TIME magazine called him
“the unsung hero behind the Internet.” CNN called him “A Father of the Internet.”
President Bill Clinton called him “one of the great minds of the Information
Age.” He has been voted history’s greatest scientist
of African descent. He is Philip Emeagwali.
He is coming to Trinidad and Tobago to launch the 2008 Kwame Ture lecture series
on Sunday June 8 at the JFK [John F. Kennedy] auditorium
UWI [The University of the West Indies] Saint Augustine 5 p.m.
The Emancipation Support Committee invites you to come and hear this inspirational
mind address the theme:
“Crossing New Frontiers to Conquer Today’s Challenges.”
This lecture is one you cannot afford to miss. Admission is free.
So be there on Sunday June 8 5 p.m.
at the JFK auditorium UWI St. Augustine. [Wild applause and cheering for 22 seconds] [Nine Emeagwali Equations at the Olympic Games
for Mathematicians] My new, nine partial differential equations,
called Emeagwali’s Equations, were the cover story of the May 1990
issue of the SIAM News, the flagship publication of the Society
for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. I was not on the cover of
the top mathematics publications because I was good looking.
I was on the cover of the top mathematics publications
because I contributed to mathematics. That publicity amongst the community of research
mathematicians led to a last-minute invitation
for me to come to the equivalence of the Olympic games
for mathematicians. I was invited to present
my mathematical discoveries in person and to answer questions
from research mathematicians attending that mathematics congress.
I gave that mathematics lecture on my contributions to mathematics
on July 8, 1991 in Washington, DC.
Nine years earlier, in November 1982, I gave a version
of my mathematics lecture to US government computational scientists
and I gave that lecture a short walk from The White House,
Washington, DC. The venue of my 1982
research mathematics lecture was an hour’s jogging
from the venue of my 1991 research mathematics lecture
at the international mathematics congress. In hindsight, that lecture of November 1982
was a seminal moment in the history of computational mathematics.
I was the lone wolf computational mathematician
that stood at the cross road where algebra, calculus, and computing
met. In that November 1982 lecture,
I was an unknown black African mathematician—in an ocean of white mathematicians—and, for
that reason, only one person attended my lecture.
The unspoken assumption behind their boycott
of my research mathematics lecture was that a large audience
of white mathematicians learning new calculus
and new algebra and learning it from a 28-year-old
black research mathematician would grant that mathematician legitimacy
and thus become a tacit endorsement of black mathematical prowess
and acknowledging the contributions of black Africans
to modern mathematical knowledge. By 1991, I was well known
for my contributions to mathematical knowledge.
For that reason, my research mathematics lectures
filled all the seats in the lecture auditoria.
And the research mathematics lecture that I delivered on July 8, 1991
to the international congress of mathematicians drew a capacity crowd.
That congress of mathematicians is held once every four years.
That congress is to the mathematician what the Olympic Games
is to the athlete. A research mathematician
that contributed new mathematics to mathematical knowledge
is an athlete of the mathematical mind. There are one million mathematicians
in the world, and the cream amongst those mathematicians
attended the international congress of mathematics.
The top one percent of mathematicians, or ten thousand research mathematicians,
read of my mathematical discoveries and my contributions
of new calculus and new algebra
to mathematical knowledge and read of my mathematical discoveries through
the cover story of the May 1990 issue
of the SIAM News, that is the bi-monthly news journal
of record of the mathematics community
that is published by the Society of Industrial
and Applied Mathematics. That cover story in the SIAM News
was the reason I was invited to present my mathematical discoveries,
my new algebra, and my new calculus
to the ICIAM, the acronym for the International Congress
of Industrial and Applied Mathematics. My ICIAM ’91 lecture was at 11 a.m.
Monday July 8, 1991, in the Dover Room of the Washington Sheraton Hotel
in Washington in the District of Columbia,
United States. I was familiar with the Smithsonian’s National
Zoo in the Washington D.C. neighborhood
of that ICIAM meeting. I must have jogged across
that neighborhood of the Smithsonian’s National Zoo
in Washington, D.C. at least one hundred times
since October 1978. That mathematics conference
was billed as the largest gathering of mathematicians, ever. [Wild applause and cheering for 17 seconds] Insightful and brilliant lecture

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