Intel Chip Kit & School Pack is AMAZING | Nostalgia Nerd

Intel Chip Kit & School Pack is AMAZING | Nostalgia Nerd


Hello children. Today’s lesson is all about the new revolution
sweeping the world, computers! We’re going to find out what they do, how
they work and how they’re going to influence your lives, in the future. Let’s get stuck in… *smash* [Refreshing Jazz Music] Back in 1994 Intel launched a programme in
the United States and Canada called The Journey Inside: The Computer. The aim of this programme was to help bolster
computer education in schools, both for teachers and students, in this rapidly changing era. To this end, 35,000 free kits were delivered
to junior high and middle schools, designed to expose children to this new technology,
whilst also packing a nice dollop of Intel branding into these knowledge hungry young
minds. The kits were created in combination with
the National Science Teachers Association, with each pack reported to be worth some $500. “And a colourful poster!” There were three core editions of this kit. The box of the first kit, actually resembled
a Desktop PC when unpacked, and was supposed to aid the discovery process. The second kit, released in 1996 offered updated components &
information This, is the third kit, released in early
1998, and it’s the one I’m going to focus on today. Presented in this rather nice box, with a
carry handle, it’s a rather sturdy, portable affair. But then this is quite a substantial kit,
so let’s get inside. [More uptempo vibrant Tokyo music] We find 3 bundles. The rather hefty teachers guide. A box of video tapes, and the piece’de
resistance. The Chip Kit. But let’s go through them in order and work
out what we can do here. This is all brand new, so everything is wrapped
in a lovely film of protective cellophane. But get ride of that, and what we find is
two destinct sections. The first contains 8 units, which are usually
broken down into Background information, Teacher materials, a Lesson Plan, and a video based
guide. The background information eases into the
section, often describing how history has arrived at this point, or the basics of the
technology. The teacher materials provides an overview
of the lesson, the goals and objectives, along with helpful resources. You’ve gotta remember that most teachers,
especially if this wasn’t a dedicated IT teacher, were probably quite new to computers as well. The Video Plan, covers these elements in regard
to the video content, and offers experiment guides, some of which we see in the videos. The second section, at the back, is a pack
of gorgeous, cellophane, overhead projector sheets. Ohhhh, yes, this is truly the 90s. We’ll explore these a bit more, as we get
into those visual guides. So, what about these videos, well, they’re
in this separate box, and we get 2 VHS tapes. The first is the Student Video, and as it
says, it’s designed to be used in conjunction withe the Teacher’s Guide. Consisting of eight segments approximately
9-10 minutes long, with each segment introducing key concepts of the corresponding unit and
video lesson. Ohhhh, yes look at that fresh VHS tape. There’s a bit of bubbling on the label, but
nothing we can’t forgive. The teachers Introduction is everything You
need to know to begin using the Journey Inside: The Computer. Follow along as we briefly walk you through
the different elements in the kit and show you what it contains and how it is organised. I guess we should start here then. Let’s dive into to some VHS quality content. *clicks* *whirrs* [light buzz from mechanism] [90s style Intel Music] “Technology is showing up in some of the most
interesting places” “In this video, I’ll walk you through the
different parts in the kit, and show you what it contains, and how it’s organised…. Dr. Irene Smith of the International Society
for Technology and Education will join me…. together, Dr. Smith and I will suggest ways
that you can adapt these materials, for your own classroom” [90s climax] This content was all produced by Design Media
Inc, working alongside Intel, out of San Francisco in 1997. Presented by Ricki Stevenson, along with Dr.
Irene Smith, from the International Society for Study and Education, we’re guided through
the kit, and then the subsequent educational units, so we, as an educator know what to
do. Pretty straight forward. “We have resistors, capacitors, diodes” The basics of how a computer works are also
covered, so the teacher doesn’t look like a complete dumb-ass in front of their students. “There’s two special words, the computer uses
the word AND and it also uses the word OR. Alright, you’re going to select the ones that
are WHITE and THREE LEGGED” “We know these are white, but these are white
AND 3 legged. You’re a very good computer Ricki” See, the video makes them feel like a plumb
instead. There’s half an hour of this, so it’s not
highly detailed, but enough to kick things off. “Students just love to touch and feel, as
you know” After confirming that students like to touch,
several times, we can then bring this 30 minute presentation to a close, and move onto the
main video. “Your students are going to have fun in this
unit…. fascinating” *clicking*
*whirring* [90s Intel Music] This is the Students video, which takes a
very different approach, and is actually, well, it’s actually pretty compelling….. [90s Intel Music intensifies] “Hello and welcome to the Journey inside,
the computer. What’s with the toaster?” “Oh, well, good question. See, this toaster illustrates the four basic
parts of the computer. Now, just like a computer at your home; the
raw data goes in. [Bread flopping sound] The information gets stored. [Twisty ratchet dial sound] Then, this raw data gets processed, or in
this case; toasted. [Toaster boing] BAM, the end result” As well as many an analogy, there’s an explanation
of the first general purpose computer, the ENIAC… “The first general purpose computer was built in 1945” “data had to be entered by flipping switches and plugging wires” “that computer, by the way, was called the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Calculator” and various roving reporter segments
by both Rebecca White and Brahman Turner, with Annette Chavez as the host. The video is divided into the same 8 units
as the guide book. “If you don’t believe me, drag your feet across
the carpet. Then reach out and touch something metal”“OW!” All sprinkled with wholesome 90s clothing
and general aesthetic. So you can see a circuit made on screen, for
example.. “Add electricity here, and the current flows. Take it away, and the switch is open” … along with some clear and simple explanations
of how transistors and semi-conductors actually work. “Let’s go over to the blue screen and I’ll
show you what I’m talking about… Now, under normal conditions, silicon is non-conductive. But when you mix in different elements like
Boron or Phosphorus, and then add electricity, Silicon becomes conductive!” Or we can join Rebecca as she discusses Binary. “Imagine what it would be like if we could
pound out the bits as fast as a computer!” [90s music segment, trying to give the impression of digital SPEED] “and that’s not even close to a computer speed” It’s all pretty compelling, even the awkward
parts… “and finally you get the big picture…. exactly….
and the big bucks…. “hehehehe” NICE….I hope so” adlibbing at it’s finest. It’s also interesting to see staff from Intel,
like Bonnie Kao, who had only been there a few years at this point, but over 20 years
later, is still working there, as a senior Director. “So what, what happens? You’ve got the Ingot, and how do you make
the wafers?… What we do is, we basically use a diamond
saw, and slice the ingot into polished wafers…. what are the things I see on top of the wafer?…. We do a very specific processing steps to
create patterns on these wafers” Y’know, this is pretty interesting stuff. And look at all these computers. With these CHUNKY CRTs… Oh yes, Mmmmmmmmmmmmmm. I like it. “There’s no more ‘my dog ate it’ or I left
it at home, because it’s supposed to be sitting right there on the network” I wonder if this was the inspiration for those
multi-coloured MMX adverts. You know, the ones with the multi-coloured
clean suits. “They’re probably working on the next level
of bunny suit too. Well, I’m ready. I wonder if these will come in colours” More likely, it was just a reference TO the
advert. -play that funky music whitttttt- The final unit, looking towards the future,
has things like “the connected car”. Featuring an early sat-nav. “I’m lost in San-Francisco, what can this
do for me?” “If you’re down town, you can get a close
up of where you are down town, by saying ‘locate on map'” “Oh, there I am!” With the style of screen we actually find
in most cars today. But with the ability to close your garage
door, wherever you are, by voice!…. “Warning, your garage door is open. Would you like it closed?” “Say yes” “Yes” “Garage door secure” You’ve just gotta hope no one was standing
below that door when the order was issued. What we have is 70 minutes of this educational
treasure, which, in a classroom setting, would typically be broken down into separate lessons. But you can imagine that for many schools,
this video would serve as their sole computer education. If your school was anything like mine, then
you’d probably watch this entire video in a single lesson, then never discuss it again. The teacher would probably just steal the
rest of the kit and sell it in Free-Ads. But, I’m sure some school’s went all out,
and integrated the kit to accompany their own lessons in this area. So let’s take another look at the guide, along
with some video content, and that chip kit to see how it all ties together. [strolling pace funky music for your brain] Now, this chip kit is really something else. So, this entire kit is designed around the
touching mentioned earlier, and so serves a number of purposes. The first being, practical experimentation,
so that we can see the effects mentioned in the guide in action. The second is to familiarise students with
parts of a computer, and how it comes together. But the third is simply, to touch. The tangible aspect of viewing and holding
these components, can really help connect you to the reality, and understand how incredible
these parts are, and how even more incredible, the whole, of a computer is. For the experimentation side, we get a crap
load of batteries. 6 C batteries, which all have an expiry date
sometime in 1999, but also have this rather appropriately named “Classic” packaging, with
a cat and 9 lives. The advertising at the time, trying to convince
you that EverReady batteries will outlast things that kill other batteries, by as many
as 9 times. We’ll see how many lives they have left shortly… We also get 8 9v PP3 batteries, which all
look incredibly alluring and comfortable in their foam packaging. Clearly, there’s enough here to assist with
classroom activities. Alongside our power, there’s also some PP3
battery connectors, a bundle of 9 red LEDs, 6 standard bulbs, a roll of insulating tape,
a handful of transistors, a coil of red and black wire, a handful of switches, a mechanical
sample CPU. Earlier kits had 486 and Pentium processors,
although I believe this one is a Pentium with MMX technology, which is nice. Although it clearly states in the guide, not
to use this in an actual PC, as it will probably damage it. So these are likely processor rejects. We also get a couple of loose, diced chips,
so that students can hold them up close, and really get a feel for how tiny the circuity
is. The red dots on these, indicate they have
failed their reliability tests. BUT, not only that, there’s also this entire
Silicon wafer, featuring, what appears to be 2 processor die slices. It’s presented in this plastic surround, so
it doesn’t get smashed to pieces, but the wafer itself is exposed, and it’s incredibly
cool to look at and inspect. [Soothiing electronica] *flop* Anyway, let’s try out a couple of experiments
from the guide. So, here’s a very basic circuit. All we need is a PP3 battery, a connector
and an led. Now we could just stick the ends of the LED
directly on the battery, but let’s do what is suggested… Positive and negative leads, to, the battery,
we should find that… the battery is… possibly dead. THE BATTERY IS DEAD. So, we pop this on a new battery. It’s a very faint light, but, there is indeed,
a light there. There we go. Now maybe let’s try using a transistor, like
that circuit in the video… I should really solder this, but I don’t want
to ruin parts of the kit. Errr, we will connect, the black to negative
terminal on the battery, and as it stands, we have no light coming out of the LED. But, if we get a round battery, and we add
a piece of wire. OK, and then we connect, the positive end
of the battery to the source, and the negative end…. this is difficult…. right, positive
to source. Negative to that part of the gate. There we go! Can see the LED lighting up. Lovely job. And that’s really the climax of this kit. Now I’d love to hear from you if you used
one of these in school during the 90s. Maybe your teacher took a different approach
to proceedings. or maybe they just played the tape, like they would have done, at my school. Let me know in the comments. *Sponsor* Allow to interject, for just a brief moment,
while I discuss this video’s sponsor, Audible. Now, Audible is a sponsor I really wanted
to get, because, I love it. Whenever I sit here doing these experiments,
I listen to Audible. When I’m editing videos, I listen to Audible. I believe listening can motivate, inspire,
inform and enrich your life. So it’s a good job that Audible are doing
a challenge to start this year. Finish 3 audiobooks by the 3rd of March, which
trust me, isn’t difficult, and get a 20 dollar Amazon credit. Listen on any device, any time with a 30 day
Audible trial. Choose one Audiobook and 2 Audible originals
free. To do this visit Audible.com/Nostalgianerd
or text nostalgianerd to 500 500. That’s Audible.com/Nostalgianerd or text nostalgianerd
to 500 500. I’m kicking off this year with H.G. Wells,
the Science Fiction collection, because I really want to get stuck in with some classic
sci-fi during 2020. Alexa! (sorry Alexa owners) Play my audiobook, H.G. Wells the collection. *sounds of space* H.G. Wells, the Science Fiction Collection So, why not click the link in the description
and join me. Let’s get back to this… *Sponsor* Bloomin’ eck. I almost forgot about the poster and transparencies. If you were a classroom goer in the 90s, I’m
almost certain that you encountered an overhead projector. These allowed you to lay sheets onto their
lighted bed, or even a laptop screen, and project the contents onto a wall or white
board. The Intel kit comes with quite a few of these
overlays, but the magic is really in the processor slices. It’s discussed briefly in the teacher video. “You’ll find in the chip kit, that you have
some transparencies. The four transparencies will help you with
the fabrication part of the chip creation. The four layers that are there, do not necessarily
hook together, we’ve just kinda pulled them at random” So, although they’re not necessarily in any
logical order, we can take these four sheets and overlay them to create an impression of
the multiple layers within a chip. Which if anything is just a colourful wonder
of transparent euphoria. Ohhh,yeah, just look at those colours, and
the transparent plastic sheet. What is it about this that I love. I have no idea. But if that wasn’t enough, the kit also has
some other bits. We’ve even got the original letter, for the
school this kit was sent to. Did anyone go to Gateway Baptist School? If so, you clearly missed out on this precious
Intel training, and for that I’m sorry. The poster is a masterpiece of childhood wonder,
managing to combine some useful information on the fundamentals of a computer with a cross
section that just makes you want to get inside a real machine and start tinkering. Very reminiscent of a Dorling Kindersley book. “Did you know that air in a chip factory is
one million times cleaner than the air that we breathe?”… Ahhh facts. There’s also a handy timeline at the bottom. It’s a very USA focused timeline, but I guess,
patriotism. It’s all Intel branded, it’s all pretty commercial. But I love it regardless. I hope you’ve enjoyed this video on, The Journey
Inside: The Computer. But there’s one thing we haven’t discussed,
and that’s The Journey Inside by Intel, in IMAX. “With this much computer power, humans will
soon be able to cross, the critical information threshold. Humans, must never be allowed to cross the
threshold” “*rocks tumbling* *gun blast*” Yes, this was a feature film, made by Intel
that went along with this pack. Released in 1994, and I think it warrants
it’s own separate video. So, stay tuned, and we’ll take a look into
it. Anyway, thanks for watching, have a great
evening” [slap on table] [Funky Sound out]

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