Better Quality 3D Prints Using MAGIC NUMBERS on ENDER 3, CR-10, A10

Better Quality 3D Prints Using MAGIC NUMBERS on ENDER 3, CR-10, A10


Did you know that your 3d printer has a
magic number and if you use that magic number you can get better print quality
I’ll explain it all on today’s Filament Friday. This episode of filament friday is
brought to you by these patreon supporters. I know many people got new
printers for Christmas or they’re just getting started with 3d printing and
they want to do a lot of modifications it’s the fun part, I get it. But before
you do any of that just learn how to use your 3d printer and how it works with
your slicer and with that you want to know your magic number and use it in
your slicer settings. So what is the magic number? Well to understand it
completely we first have to understand how a stepper motor works so let me
explain that and then I’ll get deeper into how you calculate the magic number.
This is a diagram of a very basic stepper motor. It’s got four coils or
four poles and when the center is grounded and one of the coils is
energized it’s going to align the magnet up inside with the coil and that’s going
to be one step. So if we then stop power here and put power here it’s gonna
line up there so that’s the next step so if I do this where I energize each coil
separately I can get four steps out of this guy per revolution that’s how a
basic stepper motor works and on our printers we typically have one point
eight degree movement so these coils, there are multiple coils to give us every one
point eight degrees of alignment. So at one point eight degrees
that gives us 200 steps per revolution and that’s the number we’re going to use
to calculate the magic number because we want to line up with these natural steps.
Now where the stepper drivers come in is they vary the voltage here and here
between two coils and by the difference of those two voltages you can get
multiple steps and that’s how you micro step a stepper motor but we’re not going
to worry about this for the magic number. We want to use these natural steps or
the 200 steps per revolution. So now that we generally understand that
there’s 200 natural steps in a stepper motor how does that relate to the magic
number? Well it all comes down to this threaded rod. The threaded rod will lift
the X carriage based on its pitch so on the Creality machines or even this
GEEETECH machine it lifts 8 millimeters per one revolution so now that we know we
want to stick to the natural steps or 200 steps per rotation, divide that 200
into the 8 millimeters we get zero point zero four millimeters per natural step.
That’s the magic number! And we want to stay on that magic number because then
we’re at the same position relative to each step.
Even if we’re micro stepping we are going to the same micro step every time
so we’re consistent in how we’re moving up and that gives you consistent results
and much better print quality especially on smaller prints where you’re printing
really fine detail. So now that we know our magic number is zero point zero four
we can do variations off of that for the Z height so 0.08, 0.12, 0.16, 0.2, 0.24 0.28 and 0.32. You typically don’t
want to go more than 80 percent of your nozzle so at a 0.4 nozzle, 0.32 is
like the roughest you want to go, that’s pretty rough. So now let’s compare
our magic numbers or our magic layer heights to what Cura offers in its stock settings. From the drop-down menu they
show 0.06 , 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and
a couple of course settings I don’t recommend. 0.2 is the only one
that fits within our magic number. The 0.1 or fine setting should really be
0.12 to match our magic number. Normal 0.16 extra-fine 0.08 and
the extra fast 0.3 should be like 0.28. So I
made my own profile using a 0.12 that way I’m within my magic
numbers and that’s what I use for most of my prints. But let’s compare this. I’m
gonna slice this Marvin keychain at a 0.1, the stock setting and it says
42 minutes to print with a 20% fill. Now I’m just gonna change the layer height
to 0.12 because now I’m in my magic number and it says 35 minutes to print.
I saved 7 minutes on this print but what about quality, are they the same? And here they are next to each other and frankly I can’t tell them apart. I do have some
retraction settings to improve but I can’t tell them apart
I had to mark them on the bottom. They look identical to me yet the 0.12
printed 7 minutes faster than the 0.1 so then I tried my calibration cube and
again I couldn’t tell a difference between the two. They look identical
until I put them under a microscope. Look at the 0.1 layer height. You can see
larger layers and then smaller layers scattered throughout the print and it’s
slightly off. My eye couldn’t pick this up but it’s obviously there because when I
compare it to the 0.12 with the magic number look at how smooth and even the
layers are so this clearly gives you a better print. So the magic numbers do
work! So the magic numbers seem to work although it’s minor but you save time
while getting the same print quality and under the microscope it definitely
showed a difference. And that magic number 0.04 works for all the Creality
machines that I have CR10, CR 10 mini, Ender 3 all the same and the GEEETECH
a10, a20 they all have the same 0.04 so just try that out tell me what you think
see if you see a difference in your prints. If you like what I’m doing here
maybe check out some of the videos that are popping up if you want to help
support the channel patreon is one way or just use the affiliate links in the
description below to buy filament, parts, whatever, it helps a lot and if nothing
else just click on that CHEP logo and subscribe I’ll see you next time right
here at Filment Friday

100 thoughts on “Better Quality 3D Prints Using MAGIC NUMBERS on ENDER 3, CR-10, A10

  • March 14, 2019 at 10:51 am
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    Here is more detail about Magic Numbers:
    Microstep angles aren’t equal which causes the variations in layers that I showed without magic numbers. If your bed is leveled manually or autolevel at a microstep, using magic numbers makes layers rise to that same microstep thus averaging out those variations and giving a consistent layer height as the closeup view shows,

    Reply
  • April 4, 2019 at 4:30 pm
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    You may get slightly less Z banding as well

    Reply
  • April 9, 2019 at 2:54 pm
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    Very helpful explanation. Thank you.

    Reply
  • April 10, 2019 at 9:25 am
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    Great vid!

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 10:23 am
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    When you start the 3d printer, it will auto home all axes and the motor could be between steps (cause of microsteping) when it will find Z=0. From there incrementing with 0.04mm will guarante your 0.12mm steps on Z will be a full mechanical step.

    Reply
  • April 11, 2019 at 4:55 pm
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    Huh I always throught 3 was a magic number and 4 was a four legged zoo? (Schoolhouse Rock, lol!) Also: Edit: Excellent and very useful video, thank you!

    Reply
  • April 13, 2019 at 7:54 pm
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    you have very interesting see but this is a very bad 8mm thread can not rise 8mm pro resolution, how much thread height can so much, rise for resolution be for example 1mm or 1.25. you have a 8 × 1 mm thread which means 1mm for a single turn

    Reply
  • April 15, 2019 at 6:02 pm
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    Wonderful video, but there is a thing not clear:
    You say the magic number for Ender 3 is 0.04, than profile fine 0.1 becomes 0.12; extra fine 0.06 becomes 0.08; extra fast 0.03 becomes 0.28 and finally Normal 0.15 becomes 0.16. Why so? Maby normal becomes 0.17. not 0.16. Is possible?
    Moreover if I have mounted TL-Smoothers on my motors what's happen? Numbers are different?
    Thank You
    Luigi

    Reply
  • April 17, 2019 at 3:25 pm
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    Really loving your content. Very helpful stuff. Keep up the great work and thanks

    Reply
  • April 17, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Thank YOU! You just saved me from pulling my hair out. I WOULD ADD ONE THING THO!!!!! Magic numbers also applies to other axies. What I mean. You CANT get decent result with ENDER and 0.3mm nozzle. It is possible to print but very slowly at like 15 and with acceleration set to 100 (default 500) (jerk like 5) so it makes no sense to use it. I also tried 0.6 nozzle with high temp but the print looks like draft even on 0.12 layers as motors tend to overshoot and the filament just squirts over the edge.

    Reply
  • April 18, 2019 at 8:34 pm
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    hi Chep

    great video, as usual!
    when i saw this video i thought ok he's probably right so i used the numbers and spread the word..
    but one day i thought how did he get to this number. you say your lead screw is 8mm! when i measure mine (the distance between two threads) i have 2mm. most steppers have a 1,8 degree per step so thats 200 steps for a full rotation, i come to the conclusion that my printer (ender 3) has a 0,01mm per full step (2/200=0,01).

    can you confirm i did every thing correct? and if so maybe it's wise to make another video…

    best regards!

    Reply
  • April 20, 2019 at 9:26 am
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    Great !! Indeed it works on my Ender 3 !!

    Reply
  • April 21, 2019 at 4:04 am
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    Thank you for some very insightful information. I applaud your patience with some of the comments below.

    Reply
  • April 23, 2019 at 2:18 am
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    I'm binge watching ender 3 tips while I'm waiting on delivery of my first printer I have to say, you seem to have the most knowledge and best tips that I've seen.
    I don't want to put others down and makers muse does have some tips but he's greatly biased when it comes to the creality and he's mostly putting it down.
    The 3d nerd also has great tips but I still think he's 2nd to you. Thank you

    Reply
  • April 23, 2019 at 8:39 pm
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    Please, what are the magic number for nozzle 0.2? Thanks!!

    Reply
  • April 23, 2019 at 9:08 pm
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    Another great explanation…

    I have a monoprice select mini V2 on its way , would it have the same magic numbers?

    Reply
  • April 26, 2019 at 8:54 pm
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    Hello, maybe your magic numbers work but I believe that's not for the reason you think. A stepper with 200 steps / rev will make the extruder climb 1.25mm per full rotation since a 8mm screw (M8) has 1.25 mm pitch. So if you divide 1.25 with 200, it makes 0.00625 mm climbed per step. So magic number examples could be 1.25 (200 steps), 1.5 (240 steps), 2 (320 steps)…

    EDIT: We do not have the same rods sorry, yours go up by 8mm each rev

    Reply
  • May 1, 2019 at 4:14 pm
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    Thank you. I love you.

    Reply
  • May 5, 2019 at 3:28 am
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    I have 2mm rods on the way so the magic number would be .01mm. Not sure why these companies use 8mm rods.

    Reply
  • May 7, 2019 at 6:45 am
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    As much as I appreciate the merit in what has been said here (and have adjusted my Ender 2 profiles accordingly), there's a fairly (in my opinion) significant oversight in your explanation:

    While you don't specifically mention it, you heavily imply that the improved printing speed in your Marvin was due to using a Magic Number. Cura doesn't know what the Magic Numbers are, nor does it care – it can't, since it has no idea what steppers you're using nor what pitch is on the lead screw. Ultimately it has to assume a perfect motor with a perfect screw, so the time taken to micro-step is irrelevant.

    Instead, what you're seeing is basic 3D printing settings in effect. Your 0.12 estimated faster than the 0.10 simply because the layers are thicker, thus less layers. 20% more material going down 16.67% fewer times, which corresponds perfectly to the time reduction from 42 minutes down to 35 (35 = 42 x 83.33%). Add to this the default Cura top/bottom settings of 0.60mm and you're also only doing 5 full infill layers instead of 6 for each, again reducing the overall print time.

    This is also why using 0.08 (also a Magic Number) will estimate approximately 25% longer again as compared to 0.10, since there will be 25% more layers to counteract the 20% less filament of each layer, plus 8 full infill layers top and bottom vs 6. The Magic Number doesn't come into it.

    As to whether this is true for actual print times, instead of esimates? You didn't give those times, so I've no idea. It might make layer changes ever so slightly quicker, so it should make things fractionally faster (sub-1% overall time difference). Z-hop could make the gains more significant (though still pretty small).

    Reply
  • May 7, 2019 at 1:56 pm
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    Is 0.2mm included in the magic number also? since it's always 0.04 increment as you said in the video .

    Reply
  • May 7, 2019 at 2:45 pm
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    My CR-10S from Hictop came with lead screws (2mm pitch) so basically as long as I don't try anything fancy with three digits behind the decimal point I'm fine!

    Reply
  • May 7, 2019 at 7:20 pm
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    Hello Chep, your videos are my favorite. Absolutly best.

    Reply
  • May 7, 2019 at 10:31 pm
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    Any idea what the formula would be for figuring out a delta?

    Reply
  • May 8, 2019 at 1:52 pm
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    Makes sense, hard to guarantee that the first layer won't start at a microstep height though? resulting in all subsequent layers being off the "natural" step positions. However, your results don't lie. Will have to switch it up to 0.28 or 0.32 when I'm after those fast big prints. Cheers mate.

    Reply
  • May 10, 2019 at 12:11 am
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    well, on the Taz 6 the X rod is 2mm pitch. So 0.01..

    Reply
  • May 12, 2019 at 11:18 pm
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    Hi. The TEVO Tarantula has a one start lead screw of 2mm pitch. So 1 revolution moves the Z-axis 2mm . Then the magic number is 0,01, and this means, any resolution can be possible without problems?

    Is this an advantage of 1 start-2mm-leadscrews? Where is the disadvantage?

    Reply
  • May 13, 2019 at 6:03 pm
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    These microsteps are for the vertical dimension… is there some similar consideration for the horizontal stepping?

    Reply
  • May 17, 2019 at 2:59 am
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    Do these same magic numbers work for the Ender 5 as well?

    Reply
  • May 18, 2019 at 5:05 am
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    I put the .12 in my ender 3 and it added like 4hours to the print

    Reply
  • May 19, 2019 at 3:42 am
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    Any idea what the magic number on an Ultimaker 3 S5 is?

    Great video btw. I love these videos that are packed with useful tweaks and even just understanding of the individual settings in Cura. A video that explains each setting in Cura would be awesome! …. maybe that's asking for too much. 😛

    Reply
  • June 15, 2019 at 10:27 am
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    Hello there ^^ I am an idiot at calculating (and always was). I am planning on buying the Creality CR-10-S4. Do you maybe have any tips for me, to print helmets? Star Wars helmets for my cosplay to be exact. Clone Trooper phase 1 and phase 2, original Stormtrooper, Scout Trooper, First Order Stormtrooper etc. etc. And if I may ask, is the CR able to print helmets without dome supports if I wanted to print them in one piece? Cheers and have a nice day ^^

    Reply
  • June 16, 2019 at 4:35 am
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    Excellent video! I was recommended this video by a thread on Reddit and I gotta say, I love your detailed explanation of how this works. I'm amazed I never thought about this considering I have a fair understanding of stepper motors. The things you don't know, that you don't know! Thanks for enlightening me/us on this topic! Prints are coming out much smoother using the step increment (0.04mm) for my Ender 3! Keep up the great work!

    Reply
  • June 21, 2019 at 6:38 pm
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    What doesn’t make sense about this idea is what if when it starts at the home position with the bed leveled if it’s in one of the micro steps initially and using these magic numbers will keep it in a micro step position every single time and never come to a natural step.

    Reply
  • June 22, 2019 at 4:42 pm
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    I am a total newbie on this 3D printing stuff, but this is the third video of yours I watch and this is right on the money!

    Reply
  • June 25, 2019 at 5:16 pm
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    Thank you for your videos, which are very useful ! Is there a way for you to share your Customised Printing Settings with your subscribers ? Thank you

    Reply
  • June 27, 2019 at 9:03 pm
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    Thank you from São Paulo/Brazil!!

    Reply
  • July 1, 2019 at 3:00 pm
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    HI Chep,I totally agree with it.But why Markforged use the layer height of 0.05 0.1 ……

    Reply
  • July 2, 2019 at 3:14 am
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    Does servo motor have the same problem?

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  • July 5, 2019 at 7:17 pm
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    I originally did this magic numbers thing, but recently I've seen people saying instead that the layer height should be certain multiples of the nozzle size instead. I don't know what to believe anymore 🙂

    Reply
  • July 6, 2019 at 11:21 am
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    I have to congratulate you on what is (in my opinion) probably the most informative YouTube channel I have found.
    I have a CR-10 by the way.

    Magic numbers eh? Well I'm blowed! Makes perfect sense after you explained it in such clear detail.
    I'm printing some prototype motorcycle parts in PLA, and just changed my layer height from 0.3mm (0.4mm nozzle) to 0.32mm layer height and the quality has doubled. No more strange lines. Excellent. Changed all my other little settings to 0.04mm multiples and for sure there's major improvements.

    Also, I followed your tutorial on the adaptive layers. Oh man, why haven't I used this before? I just printed a small shaft that has an M5 external thread either side of a larger diameter, barrel shaped body. Previously I would have printed the whole thing at say a 0.1mm layer height to make sure I get a useable thread, and it would have taken forever. Now with adaptive layers, and of course the "Magic Numbers" it's printed out like a dream. Layer height is 0.08mm on the external threads and 0.32mm on the barrel section. And with no post processing, it screws into the little thumbwheel I printed out previous to that. Perfecto!!!

    Reply
  • July 6, 2019 at 12:12 pm
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    magic numbers don't make sense to me really. they don't make a real life difference

    Reply
  • July 6, 2019 at 8:44 pm
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    Someone has been listening to you! The CreawsomeMod on Cura 4.1 implements 0.12mm, 0.16mm, 0.20mm, and 0.28mm layers .. all mutliples of 0.04.
    The Maker's muse has a dirty trick for super fast drafts using 0.3mm layers and some other tricks… 0.32 is an awfully coarse extension of the magic number. It will probably look like hell, but maybe I'll try a small print to see what happens.

    Reply
  • July 7, 2019 at 6:19 am
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    Cura only?

    Reply
  • July 8, 2019 at 9:35 pm
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    Hi,

    Quick question. I have a CR20pro. Im using a cura profile I found on github, it ok I think. But could I use Ender 3 or CR 10 profile that comes with cura installation ?

    Reply
  • July 12, 2019 at 5:30 pm
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    I'm not sure I understand how the stepper motor works. Is he saying there's 200 magnetic coils in the stepper motor?

    His drawn example shows 4 steps per revolution, but an actual motor has steps for each 1.8 degrees.

    Reply
  • July 13, 2019 at 10:11 am
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    I hated to hear 'magic number' at first, but I guess it's a common term for practical sweet spot for things

    I suppose the best resolution that any 3d printer that has the same Z lead screw and stepper motor as Creality machines, should be 0.04mm/40micron, never listed anywhere, but that is quite impressive considering 8mm/rev pitch might seem rough to some, as I remember browsing for my first 3D printer that usually FDM only does 0.1mm at maximum, which usually seems good enough, but now I know that this is hardware-imposed limits that can be properly highlighted

    once I started to notice the difference even without viewing aid(very clear in finer layer heights, even your results clearly showed it to me), can't go back, magic numbers all the way, the irregularity in non magic number layer height even causes some strength issues, think it missed a forced microstep or two. big thanks !

    Reply
  • July 14, 2019 at 10:58 am
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    Hello. I order a new printer, this magic numbers work in Tevo Tornado? Thank's.

    Reply
  • July 14, 2019 at 11:07 pm
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    If I got this right, there might be a flaw in using 0.04 as the magic number… In your calculation you are assuming, the stepper motor has exactly 200 steps per revolution. However when I printed a calibration cube I needed to adjust the steps per mm in the printer settings. Wouldn't it be more precise to use these values to calculate the magic number?

    Reply
  • July 15, 2019 at 4:55 pm
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    Shouldn't you calculate your magic number from the calibrated M92 Z value? Not everyone's leadscrew and stepper motor is going to be 100% accurate.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 9:51 am
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    just earned yourself a new subscriber, thanks for the explanation to my findings.

    Reply
  • July 17, 2019 at 2:50 pm
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    This is the most informative channel on 3D printing. Period. Short, sweet, straight to the point, clean audio, great examples. I am learning so much as a beginner!

    Reply
  • July 20, 2019 at 3:51 pm
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    Hi. Great video. Can you do a follow up showing step by step how different printers may need to be calculated? Not all are 1.8 degree steps.
    Also, would this have any effect on X or Y axis? I feel it wouldn't but I could be wrong.

    Reply
  • July 20, 2019 at 9:24 pm
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    Cura is not letting me edit the value.

    Reply
  • July 25, 2019 at 7:37 pm
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    Great video. I already thought that would make sence by investigations I made. But couldn’t proove it using math.

    Reply
  • July 29, 2019 at 1:37 pm
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    How do you know whether you start off at a magic number? I mean if you start at 0.67 sure you can add 0.04 but thats still off because its 0.71. Thats not a magic number. Anyone have any tips?

    Reply
  • August 2, 2019 at 7:09 pm
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    Do you have the calculations for a Delta printer (IVI Printer)

    Reply
  • August 6, 2019 at 12:23 pm
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    Do these Magic numbers change with Nozzle diameter .. i've been using a .06mm nozzle … with mixed results

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  • August 6, 2019 at 10:37 pm
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    Thanks Chep, excellent video. Though I got a little confused but the community comments help explained further. Thanks to all as well.

    Reply
  • August 7, 2019 at 1:58 pm
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    Will printing with a larger first layer completely negate magic numbers for the following layers?

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  • August 7, 2019 at 7:40 pm
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    Chep, checked the pitch on my TEVO Tarantula. One revolution of the Z screw lifted the nozzle 2mm. So the magic number for my machine would be 2/200, or 0.01. Is this correct?

    Reply
  • August 10, 2019 at 3:45 am
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    I see that Dragons Minis profile. You watch 3d printed tabletop as well?

    Reply
  • August 10, 2019 at 9:18 pm
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    Very interesting, i just downloaded the latest Cura update and the now offer 0.12 0.16 0.20 and 0.28 as the default layer heights.

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  • August 11, 2019 at 6:36 pm
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    You should add that Marlin has an option to fade to full step (when using the magic number) if you use probe/bed leveling. It's enabled by default on the Prusa.

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  • August 12, 2019 at 5:28 am
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    Awesome!! So excited to give these a shot!! Thank you!!

    Reply
  • August 14, 2019 at 1:49 pm
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    so i never knew this before, but i realized at some point, that with 0.15 layerheight for example my z axis motor gave off some weird whining noises every 2 layers.. i figured that this did not happen when i chose even numbers for my layerheights, such as 0.14 or 0.08. now i know i probably should be using 0.16, but still i finally have an explanation for it! thanks a lot! ;P

    Reply
  • August 15, 2019 at 7:46 pm
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    I recently found your channel. I binged watch you and applied your wisdom and man what a difference. Your magic number really work , my printer has now been stripped back to next to stock and is printing much higher quality than ever before. I am now convinced it is slicer setting and tuning that is the Key not hardware. FYI the printer is a now stock old type CR10s. Thanks mate your a Star 🙂

    Reply
  • August 22, 2019 at 9:32 pm
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    What about for prusa printers

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  • August 24, 2019 at 1:20 pm
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    thanks for this infomation. greetz from germany

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 5:16 am
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    Does the 1.1.5 silent mainboard upgrade change the magic numbers? This has the new drivers? I do not think, as the motor does not change…? Please confirm… Thanks, Nick

    Reply
  • August 28, 2019 at 5:23 am
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    how would i know if my zero is on a magic number or between multiple steps? does this matter? is it possible?

    Reply
  • September 1, 2019 at 8:00 pm
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    would it be better to have a higher or lower thread pitch? A 2mm pitch would give a magic number of 0.01mm but would it be worth it? If you get what i mean

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  • September 2, 2019 at 1:57 am
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    Thank you for passing on clearly brilliant advice in your videos. After watching thwm i have now infact bought the ender 3 along with the extra nozzles, it arrives on the 11th. I will be using magic numbers like the 3d printing bible after seeing these results.
    Question pretty please with a cherry on top?
    How can i apply the magic numbers when making D&D-style table top miniatures? As in with the smaller nozzles, i would like to aim for a relatively detailed finish if possible. Using Hatchbox PLA and files from thingiverse, as i literally am newb level, in the future i will attempt my own designs, but for now i want to go on a printing binge without blowing a roll of filament 😅.

    Reply
  • September 8, 2019 at 1:52 pm
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    It looks like this has been changed in Cura, when I installed my ender 3, I have non default presets.

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  • September 9, 2019 at 7:04 pm
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    .08 nozzle with the magic number .56 awesome

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  • September 18, 2019 at 1:40 am
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    Thank you

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  • September 19, 2019 at 4:03 pm
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    you totally makes 3d print something really easier thanks alot for the knowladge that you share

    Reply
  • September 25, 2019 at 12:09 am
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    thanks from England uk youve helped loads with the ender 3

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  • September 26, 2019 at 2:36 pm
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    My stock setting for layer height in Cura is 0.2

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  • October 1, 2019 at 10:15 pm
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    When I first watched this video, I only half paid attention because of the use of the buzz word "magic" and the fact that you seemed to oversimplify.
    I have to admit I was biased against this, and because of that when I first tried it, I didn't give it a fair comparison.
    But now after reviewing this video and trying it out again, I have to say this is fantastic.

    Big note, the lead screw I had on my machine was a 5mm one, with a 2mm per revolution rate, which means effectively any layer height divisible by 0.01 works.
    However since I upgraded to an 8mm lead screw, with 8mm per revolution, I had a few mysterious issues.
    I could never quite nail down.

    But this… this single handedly fixed the issue.
    I wanted to write this to thank you deeply for sharing this.
    I almost want to say rename it from magic numbers, but my bias against the word magic is what needs renaming XD

    Reply
  • October 2, 2019 at 2:19 pm
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    I looked at about 7 vids from you I was going to buy a ender 5 pro but now I think ill just get a 2end ender 3 and ill be trying the 0.12 and now I no what the update is in crua so ill go a head and install it thanks for your info

    Reply
  • October 2, 2019 at 3:06 pm
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    do not update crua I just did now I can not load anything no g code no stl

    Reply
  • October 2, 2019 at 3:12 pm
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    I found a way to open them now stl files hafe to be opened in side cura and thay hafe to be on the desk top not in a folder I wish I never updated hopefully cura fixs this soon soon

    Reply
  • October 4, 2019 at 5:12 pm
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    you are the best

    Reply
  • October 8, 2019 at 7:31 pm
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    I printed a small part using the .12 profile. The brim is so thin I can't get it off the bed (Ender 3). Any tips?
    Also, I was hoping Cura had a way to print the brim at a difference layer thickness then the rest of the model, but I don't see any setting for that.

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  • October 9, 2019 at 6:49 am
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    You mention that this works for microstepping in between layers or if you are are natural steps. Is there a way to check if you are at a natural step or microstep, and perhaps adjust so that you are at natural steps throughout using z-offset?

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  • October 12, 2019 at 4:29 pm
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    For anyone struggling to get the mm per revolution, remember that the rods generally have 4 threads running along them. You should measure the distance between threads, and then multiply it by the number of threads running along the rod. For example 2mm pitch in a rod with 4 threads, is 8mm per revolution that is mentioned here.

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  • October 14, 2019 at 5:12 am
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    You’re interpreting it wrong. 0.04 is the size of 1 step, so you want a layer height that is an exact number of steps (otherwise the stepper will go to the closest integer number of steps, causing the height variations). Your results are correct but your explanation isn’t.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 4:51 pm
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    Good stuff! I'll be using this info in my next print on my Ender 5.

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  • October 20, 2019 at 10:57 pm
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    I dunno, seems your cherry picking your results when your looking under a microscope because under your 0.12 layer you can clearly see bigger blobs at the bottom but you chose to ignore them and point to smaller ones

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  • October 21, 2019 at 2:12 pm
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    Are these magic numbers now incorporated on cura now?
    I'm looking at the default profiles and I have 0.12, 0.16, 0.2 and 0.28 layer heights.

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  • October 23, 2019 at 10:04 pm
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    There are magic numbers for the extruder % too?

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  • November 3, 2019 at 8:31 pm
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    I have a question that has been eating at me for a while. You say the rise of the of the lead screw is 8mm, but that seems awfully steep. No matter how many threads there are, one full revolution of the motor will only raise the Z-axis to the next thread. I believe most lead screws are 2mm from thread to thread, so wouldn't the magic number be 0.01?

    I'm not saying you're wrong. Just saying I'm confused and don't understand how you got the 8mm number.

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  • November 7, 2019 at 6:53 am
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    Based on the info gathered here, I changed my Z stepper to a 0.9 degree and 1mm Pitch SS Lead Screw. It now takes a day and a half to home the Z axis.

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  • November 10, 2019 at 11:51 pm
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    Any chance you may now the magic numbers for the Anycubic i3 Mega printer ?

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  • November 15, 2019 at 5:17 pm
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    I just got an E3 and tried two benchy prints in a row, one with the stock profile in cura 4.3 for the E3 and right after the one with your magic 0.12 profile. The stock profile actually printed better for me. It's not a universal improvement, but I'm sure it works well for some poeple.

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  • November 18, 2019 at 9:20 am
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    Chep I have used your settings in cura for each layer height and have never produced a quality print. Anything I'm doing wrong? My bed is level and so is my table

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  • November 29, 2019 at 11:36 pm
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    spoiler 0.8 0.12 0.16 0.2 0.24 0.28 0.32 but watch the video because have a lot of usefull information

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  • December 2, 2019 at 7:50 am
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    They work flawless! Printed the Chernobyl mini building and it was the best print I ever got out of my ender 3 using the 0.12

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